Suburban coyotes pose threat to pets and small children

As fall and winter approach, people are seeing more and more coyotes prowling suburban, and sometimes even city, neighborhoods. These animals are one of the most adaptable in the US and they are predators. The advice given here is meant for adults!

coyote prowling

coyote prowling

The Coyote in the photo above, very blurry photo!, was spotted prowling a Reno business looking for an easy meal.

As people encroach into traditional habitats, more and more encounters with predators are the logical result and everyone should be well aware of it. A major problem that actually encourages predators such as the coyote to become bold around humans is a lack of adverse interactions. Most people enjoy watching wildlife of all kinds and simply don’t react in a way that the coyote sees as a threat. Also, people love to keep pets such as cats and small dogs that they coyote can see might be an easy meal. Combine those two things and we now have predators with little fear of humans coming more boldly into back yards in search of prey. If you live in coyote country, and most suburban areas are just that, you must keep this in mind.

Though I do not advocate any kind of eradication efforts, I do think that we can do more to instill a natural fear into the coyote population. We need to be active in this effort. One of the methods I feel may be beneficial to both humans and coyotes is the use of non-lethal weapons. When a coyote is in near proximity to human habitation, it would not be cruel or harmful for someone to hit it with a few shots from a paintball gun. Yes it would cause the coyote some short term pain but it would also associate humans with danger and be less bold in the future. Other things such as “bean bag” rounds from a shotgun or the use of live traps would help.

For people who feel that deadly means should be used, that would certainly eliminate the current crop of coyote from the neighborhood but it presents other dangers. Firearm use could endanger people from stray shots and poisons are not at all selective. I think it is much better to use non-lethal force in suburbia thus instilling a fear of humans in general.

The headline mentioned small children as being at risk. It is rare but coyote have been known to attempt attacks on small kids. The near presence of adults does not always prevent those attacks because, again, coyotes have grown accustomed to humans. They have not been threatened by humans in the suburban areas and have little real fear of them.

If you see a coyote near your home, get the kids and pets inside! Once you have done that, throw rocks, bottles, or anything else you can at the coyote. Try your best to hit him! Hard! You will be doing your neighborhood and the coyote a favor if you are able to teach it that humans are dangerous. Never approach to closely though. If the coyote persists or doesn’t scare off, that is a major danger sign and you should call 911. It could be that the coyote is rabid if it either does not scare off or starts to approach you.

I have come across coyote in many different situations. In areas where coyote hunting is allowed, they ALWAYS ran as soon as they became aware of me. In areas where coyote are not hunted, such as suburban neighborhoods, they tend to be shy but curious.

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24 Responses to Suburban coyotes pose threat to pets and small children

  1. smithsan says:

    Coyotes in the Northeast have been stereotyped as huge. They’re larger than coyotes elsewhere, but that’s typical of a lot of species, such as bears. This is known as a latitudinal cline as you go north, animals get larger. Once you factor that in, it’s not clear that coyotes of the Northeast are exceptionally large. Actually, there are no standout differences among coyote populations across the range of the species.
    ————–
    smithsan
    Nevada Drug Addiction

  2. smithsan says:

    Coyotes in the Northeast have been stereotyped as huge. They’re larger than coyotes elsewhere, but that’s typical of a lot of species, such as bears. This is known as a latitudinal cline as you go north, animals get larger. Once you factor that in, it’s not clear that coyotes of the Northeast are exceptionally large. Actually, there are no standout differences among coyote populations across the range of the species.
    ————–
    smithsan
    Nevada Drug Addiction

  3. 101DoFollowBlogs says:

    I’ve heard some good things about this blog. Remember to balance the pics with the text tho. cheers!

  4. 101DoFollowBlogs says:

    I’ve heard some good things about this blog. Remember to balance the pics with the text tho. cheers!

  5. admin says:

    Actually, I try to provide many more photos than text but for this article, I had only the one photo.

    Thanks for reading my blog!

  6. admin says:

    Actually, I try to provide many more photos than text but for this article, I had only the one photo.

    Thanks for reading my blog!

  7. Terry says:

    9/23/10 @ 9:40AM my 8 lb yorkie was attacked in our back yard just 30 feet from our back door. He was on a long tether and I was keeping an eye on him. My husband and I heard a yelp and ran outside to see a coyote trying to carry off our dog. We did scare him off and luckily our dog only has a couple of puncture wounds. He is currently at our Vet getting well taken care of. We live in the Steamboat Valley area, between Rhodes Road and Andrew Lane. We are aware of the coyote population out here and heard of a bear over on Andrew Lane. Also some people have seen Mountain Lion tracks. This coyote was almost the size of a german shepard and we hear them at night but never have I seen one so close during the day. I am always cautious when I am out with my dog, but now I will be even more so. Just wanted to share this bit of info.

    • admin says:

      Terry, thank you for sharing this. People must remain aware around here. I work out near the Stead airport on the night shift. I see and hear coyotes almost every night I work. They are pretty bold compared to the ones way out in the wilderness.

      Also, I wanted to thank you for posting a comment in general!

      I think I’ll go camping “somewhere” next week and I’ll be sure to post the details of that trip as well as any photos I get….maybe a video too!

  8. Terry says:

    9/23/10 @ 9:40AM my 8 lb yorkie was attacked in our back yard just 30 feet from our back door. He was on a long tether and I was keeping an eye on him. My husband and I heard a yelp and ran outside to see a coyote trying to carry off our dog. We did scare him off and luckily our dog only has a couple of puncture wounds. He is currently at our Vet getting well taken care of. We live in the Steamboat Valley area, between Rhodes Road and Andrew Lane. We are aware of the coyote population out here and heard of a bear over on Andrew Lane. Also some people have seen Mountain Lion tracks. This coyote was almost the size of a german shepard and we hear them at night but never have I seen one so close during the day. I am always cautious when I am out with my dog, but now I will be even more so. Just wanted to share this bit of info.

    • admin says:

      Terry, thank you for sharing this. People must remain aware around here. I work out near the Stead airport on the night shift. I see and hear coyotes almost every night I work. They are pretty bold compared to the ones way out in the wilderness.

      Also, I wanted to thank you for posting a comment in general!

      I think I’ll go camping “somewhere” next week and I’ll be sure to post the details of that trip as well as any photos I get….maybe a video too!

  9. Kaylee Lopez says:

    Paintball guns are sometimes painfull when you are hit by a paintball~-~

    • admin says:

      When it comes to coyotes in town, the fact that paintballs can hurt, but not really injure, is the idea. Coyotes are losing their fear of humans in these areas….that fear needs to be restored for everyone’s safety….including the safety of the coyote.

  10. Kaylee Lopez says:

    Paintball guns are sometimes painfull when you are hit by a paintball~-~

    • admin says:

      When it comes to coyotes in town, the fact that paintballs can hurt, but not really injure, is the idea. Coyotes are losing their fear of humans in these areas….that fear needs to be restored for everyone’s safety….including the safety of the coyote.

  11. when i shoot my paintball gun, i always make sure that i shoot some of my playmates `

  12. when i shoot my paintball gun, i always make sure that i shoot some of my playmates `

  13. Would you be eager about exchanging links?

    • admin says:

      Since deck railing has little to do with outdoor exploration…I don’t think it would be a good match for either of us

      HOWEVER, since you were straight up about your wishes and did not generate some nonsensical post to try and spam the blog, I’ll leave this comment right here so the link to your site can get a little exposure.

  14. Would you be eager about exchanging links?

    • admin says:

      Since deck railing has little to do with outdoor exploration…I don’t think it would be a good match for either of us

      HOWEVER, since you were straight up about your wishes and did not generate some nonsensical post to try and spam the blog, I’ll leave this comment right here so the link to your site can get a little exposure.

  15. Greg Coliten says:

    I grew up in the mountains and have lived around wildlife for a good portion of my life, but the coyotes we’re seeing around here are dangerous for a number of reasons. Seeing them around heavily human populated areas is a huge threat. It shows they have no fear of us. Back home, a few years ago, a 3 year old girl was attacked and dragged off by a small pack of coyotes. For a short time it was all over the news. Since then I have employed my hunting and shooting skills to target high population areas of coyotes, away from human populated areas. But the problem here is they’re breeding habits cause a steady population growth.

    • admin says:

      Greg, good comment! Coyotes, cougar, and other wildlife are becoming increasingly unafraid in suburban, and even urban, areas. It is my opinion that it is because they are not hunted or otherwise bothered in those areas…they learn that humans won’t harm or attack them and that most humans will react with fear when they are encountered. It is a bad situation for humans and wildlife…

  16. Greg Coliten says:

    I grew up in the mountains and have lived around wildlife for a good portion of my life, but the coyotes we’re seeing around here are dangerous for a number of reasons. Seeing them around heavily human populated areas is a huge threat. It shows they have no fear of us. Back home, a few years ago, a 3 year old girl was attacked and dragged off by a small pack of coyotes. For a short time it was all over the news. Since then I have employed my hunting and shooting skills to target high population areas of coyotes, away from human populated areas. But the problem here is they’re breeding habits cause a steady population growth.

    • admin says:

      Greg, good comment! Coyotes, cougar, and other wildlife are becoming increasingly unafraid in suburban, and even urban, areas. It is my opinion that it is because they are not hunted or otherwise bothered in those areas…they learn that humans won’t harm or attack them and that most humans will react with fear when they are encountered. It is a bad situation for humans and wildlife…

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